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Alex Katz Red Dogwood 2, 2021 archival pigment ink on Innova Etching Cotton Rag 315 gsm fine art paper 53 1/4 x 39 3/4 inches (framed)   ARTIST BIO Alex Katz (American, b. 1927) is one of the most recognized and widely-exhibited artists of his generation. Often associated with the Pop Art movement, Katz began exhibiting his work in 1954, and since that time he has produced a celebrated body of work that includes paintings, drawings, sculpture, and prints. His earliest work took inspiration from various aspects of mid-century American culture and society, including television, film, and advertising, and over the past five and a half decades he has established himself as a preeminent painter of modern life, whose distinctive portraits and lyrical landscapes bear a flattened surface and consistent economy of line. Utilizing characteristically wide brushstrokes, large swathes of color, and refined compositions, Katz created what art historian Robert Storr called “a new and distinctive type of realism in American art which combines aspects of both abstraction and representation.” Since the 1950s, Alex Katz’s work has been the subject of more than 200 solo exhibitions and nearly 500 group exhibitions around the world. His work can be found in nearly 100 public collections worldwide, including the Art Institute of Chicago; the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris; Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, Madrid; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC; The Tate Gallery, London; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York,...

LILIANA PORTER To Wait, 2004 etching with hand coloring, edition of 20 21 1/4 x 19 1/4 inches (framed)   ARTIST BIO Born in Buenos Aires in 1941, Liliana Porter studied at the Escuela Nacional de Bellas Artes in Buenos Aires (1954–58) and the Universidad Iberoámericana in Mexico City (1958–61). She has lived in New York since 1964. Her diverse oeuvre comprises printmaking, works on canvas, and time-based media as well as installations and public art projects. Porter began her career as a printmaker and studied at Pratt Institute in Brooklyn in the mid-1960s, shortly after arriving in the United States. In 1964 she and Luis Camnitzer (b. 1937), her then-husband, whom she had met at Pratt, as well as the Venezuelan printmaker José Guillermo Castillo (1938–1999), founded the experimental New York Graphic Workshop, active until 1970, which promoted the destruction and disposability of the art object through the creation of FANDSO (Free, Assemblage, Nonfunctional, Disposable, Serial Object). Among her most celebrated early works was a series of photoengravings and installations of sheets of crumpled paper from the 1960s that troubled obvious distinctions between object and image and cemented Porter's reputation as an important early exponent of conceptualism. By the late 1960s, photography would replace printmaking as her primary vehicle, prompting a profound change in the character of her work over the next several decades as she increasingly employed photomontage and appropriation to question distinctions between mimetic images and their referents. Since the mid- 1980s she has created paintings, drawings, collages, videos, and photographs of kitsch and...

LILIANA PORTER Concert, 2004 etching with collage and hand-coloring, edition of 35 20 1/4 x 20 1/4 inches (framed)   ARTIST BIO Born in Buenos Aires in 1941, Liliana Porter studied at the Escuela Nacional de Bellas Artes in Buenos Aires (1954–58) and the Universidad Iberoámericana in Mexico City (1958–61). She has lived in New York since 1964. Her diverse oeuvre comprises printmaking, works on canvas, and time-based media as well as installations and public art projects. Porter began her career as a printmaker and studied at Pratt Institute in Brooklyn in the mid-1960s, shortly after arriving in the United States. In 1964 she and Luis Camnitzer (b. 1937), her then-husband, whom she had met at Pratt, as well as the Venezuelan printmaker José Guillermo Castillo (1938–1999), founded the experimental New York Graphic Workshop, active until 1970, which promoted the destruction and disposability of the art object through the creation of FANDSO (Free, Assemblage, Nonfunctional, Disposable, Serial Object). Among her most celebrated early works was a series of photoengravings and installations of sheets of crumpled paper from the 1960s that troubled obvious distinctions between object and image and cemented Porter's reputation as an important early exponent of conceptualism. By the late 1960s, photography would replace printmaking as her primary vehicle, prompting a profound change in the character of her work over the next several decades as she increasingly employed photomontage and appropriation to question distinctions between mimetic images and their referents. Since the mid- 1980s she has created paintings, drawings, collages, videos, and photographs of kitsch and...

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