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CECILY BROWN Who Killed Cock Robin?, 2014 offset lithograph   ARTIST BIO Cecily Brown is one of the most celebrated artists working in painting today. She draws from the compositional structure, historical motifs, and virtuosic brushwork of master painters across a diverse range of genres. Key to the success of Brown’s aesthetic is her ability to seemingly transform paint into flesh, embedding the human form within a frenzied, fragmented commentary on desire, life, and death. If painters are storytellers, then Brown has stories to tell, and they can be barbaric, shredded and fragmentary. Her figurative abstractions tell stories, often many at a time, in ways that activate every inch of the canvas or paper. Early in her career, she was celebrated for her embrace of sexuality, often depicted by frolicking bunnies and later with orgiastic human figures. Over the past twenty years, Brown’s work has evolved gradually, expanding in scale, diversifying in allusion and palette, and incorporating elements of landscape. Sometimes she uses improvisation to kick-start new paintings, allowing unplanned initial strokes to help dictate the works’ subsequent direction. On other occasions she borrows imagery from art history, popular culture, or the intersection of the two. Born in London, Brown graduated from Slade School of Fine Art in the early 1990s before moving to New York, where she continues to live and work today. Her work is included in public collections such as the Guggenheim Museum, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Brooklyn Museum, New York; the Louisiana Museum, Denmark; the National Gallery of Norway,...

JOSEF ALBERS WLS XIV, from White Line Squares (Series II), 1966 lithograph in colors 23 1/4 x 23 1/4 inches (framed)   ARTIST BIO Josef Albers was among the leading pioneers of twentieth-century modernism. He was an influential teacher, writer, painter, and color theorist—now best known for the Homages to the Square he painted between 1950 and 1976 and for his innovative 1963 publication Interaction of Color. In 1920, Albers enrolled as a student at the Bauhaus, a new teaching institution which transformed modern design and emphasized the connection between artist, architects and craftspeople. Once he was at the Bauhaus, he met his wife, Anni, also an artist, and started to make glass assemblages, sandblasted glass constructions, and large stained-glass windows for houses and buildings. He also designed furniture, household objects, and an alphabet. In 1925, he was the first Bauhaus student to be asked to join the faculty and become a master. At the end of the decade he made exceptional photographs and photo-collages, documenting Bauhaus life with flair. By 1933, when pressure from the Nazis forced the school to shut its doors, Josef Albers had become one of its best-known artists and teachers, and was among those who decided to close the school rather than comply with the Third Reich and reopen adhering to its rules and regulations. In 1933, Josef was asked to make the visual arts the center of the curriculum at the newly established Black Mountain College in North Carolina. He remained at Black Mountain until 1949, continuing his exploration of a range...

ALEX KATZ Yellow Flags on White, 2023 archival pigment ink print 24 x 30 inches (unframed)   ARTIST BIO Alex Katz (American, b. 1927) is one of the most recognized and widely-exhibited artists of his generation. Often associated with the Pop Art movement, Katz began exhibiting his work in 1954, and since that time he has produced a celebrated body of work that includes paintings, drawings, sculptures, and prints. His earliest work took inspiration from various aspects of mid-century American culture and society, including television, film, and advertising, and over the past five and a half decades he has established himself as a preeminent painter of modern life, whose distinctive portraits and lyrical landscapes bear a flattened surface and consistent economy of line. Utilizing characteristically wide brushstrokes, large swathes of color, and refined compositions, Katz created what art historian Robert Storr called “a new and distinctive type of realism in American art which combines aspects of both abstraction and representation.” Since the 1950s, Alex Katz’s work has been the subject of more than 200 solo exhibitions and nearly 500 group exhibitions around the world. His work can be found in nearly 100 public collections worldwide, including the Art Institute of Chicago; the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris; Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, Madrid; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC; The Tate Gallery, London; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among many others.   SUBMIT INQUIRY BELOW hbspt.forms.create({ ...

JO BAER Amphora Frieze, 2004 suite of seven screen prints 20 1/2 x 27 inches (each)   ARTIST BIO Jo Baer has engaged in an ongoing commitment to painting for over five decades. In the 1960s and 70s, she explored non-objectivity in her black and white hard-edge paintings as part of the New York Minimalist movement. She left New York for Europe in 1975, eventually settling in Amsterdam after years spent in Ireland and London. Through the course of her move to Europe, Baer’s work shifted away from pure abstraction, gradually adding figural elements, text, images and symbols. Baer has been the subject of one-artist exhibitions at institutions worldwide, including the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (1975); Van Abbe Museum, Einhaven, Netherlands (1978, 1986); Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam (1986, 1999, 2013); the Dia Center for the Arts, New York (2002); Secession, Vienna (2008); Museum Ludwig, Cologne (2013); and Camden Arts Centre, London (2015).   SUBMIT INQUIRY BELOW hbspt.forms.create({ region: "na1", portalId: "22383903", formId: "391f530e-59f4-4ad0-81cb-e54bea6411d6" }); ...

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